22 Comments

  1. Mike
    1/15/2016
    Reply

    Marvelous – and thought-provoking.

  2. David Hunter
    1/15/2016
    Reply

    Nothing I have ever seen that was sports related can compare to these photos. If you’re not moved by them check to see if you have a heartbeat. All-time greatest sports photos? This is it. That’s the list.

  3. JG
    1/15/2016
    Reply

    Thanks for the stroll down memory lane. It’s not often you have an unexpected connection to such a well-known event, especially from another generation, but love to tell this story. Started dating my wife in the late 1980s and sometime a few years later (can’t remember the exact year) I decided a “perfect” date (for me that is) was a trip to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton. There hung an enormous version of the iconic photo of the bloodied Y.A. Tittle. As we looked at the photo an older gentleman, who had been nearby, asked if we would like him to take our picture in front of the photo. More interested in a picture of us, we said okay. After taking our picture he went on to tell us he had taken the picture of Tittle and gave us some of the history of it. It was Morris Berman. I wasn’t ready to believe him, but figured there would be no harm in letting him take our picture with our camera. However after getting back home, I immediately looked up Morris Berman and found pictures that confirmed it was indeed him who had been at the HOF and taken our picture.

  4. Tom Rieck
    1/15/2016
    Reply

    Hindsight being 20-20, the image that was published is the best. Nonetheless, it was a good decision to go with the one that we’re familiar with. Now we have more information that allows the (more) human side to come out. Sportsmanship like this needs to make a comeback!

  5. 1/15/2016
    Reply

    Frame 25’s power is in the loneliness of Tittle. As suggested, it elicits compassion in a rought, tough sport.

    Thanks for the article and thanks to my friend Valerie for bringing it to my attention.

  6. Peter
    1/15/2016
    Reply

    Fascinating. Thank you for sharing this whole sequence. The isolated Tittle is in its own way the most memorable. But the photo of the hit – my gosh. This photo sequence is as current as today’s headlines, and movies.

  7. Art DiGiacomo
    1/18/2016
    Reply

    I’ve loved the YA photo from theb first time I viewed it. it’s a classic once in a life time catch.

  8. Dan Joseph
    1/19/2016
    Reply

    Great find, great article. I’d like to point out something else in the photos — the empty seats at Pitt Stadium. So drastically different from what we’d see a decade later.

  9. 2/16/2017
    Reply

    My friendship with Morris (“Morrie”) Berman is unrelated to photography or “the” photo. For 25 years, I was a nightclub entertainer in Sun City AZ where Morrie and his wife Diana came to enjoy dinner, dancing, drinks, and my cabaret-style show. We would chat about “whatever” during my breaks and after the show. One day, the owner of Jim Henry’s at the Ridge (my last gig), Bob Travers, told me of Morrie’s earlier fame as the guy who took Tittle’s iconic picture. Bob also informed me that he had asked Morrie to photograph portraits of attendees at our gala New Year’s Eve bash. When I saw him from the stage taking those shots with effortless ease, I decided to chat with him after work about his career as a photographer. He told me the story of the Tittle photo. What he said pretty much matches what has been chronicled by journalists and photographers for decades since 1964. But none of them include something he told me that New Year’s night that has shaped me as the teacher of photography (which I currently do for “Arizona Highways Photography Workshops). He said that, after the Steeler’s interception of Tittle’s pass, his Speed Graflex camera jammed and he had to pause to fix the problem while the other photojournalists found and shot all the excitement around them. When Morrie got his camera operable a few moments later, he looked up and saw the situation with Tittle and captured a few frames. As I listened to this now very old man and saw the youthful enthusiasm on his face as he recalled the story, I asked him, “What’s the secret, Morrie?” He replied, “Just look where everyone else isn’t looking.” That advice is the foundation of my instruction of all photographers I am privilege to teach, coach, and mentor. Thank you, Mr. Morris Berman!

  10. 2/17/2017
    Reply

    Hi, Al — Tried to open the links in Firefox. Even allowed the video app (which I use myself) . . . but no go. So, am I right in thinking that the story Morrie told you differs from the one he told me?

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