7 Comments

  1. hguy
    6/23/2017
    Reply

    Awesome story. Thank you! Loved the Teaberry Commercial. Herb Alpert’s music was everywhere int he late 1960s. A magical time. Zagnut is still the best candy bar ever.

  2. Janice Emerson
    6/23/2017
    Reply

    I recently bought a box of Clark Bites. I’m from W. Pa. and thought it would be a piece of the past. Instead, the chocolate was bitter and the filling was nothing like I remembered. I miss Clark Bars and Zagnuts!

  3. Pat Altenhof
    6/23/2017
    Reply

    I remember in the late 40’s when a Clark Bar was a rare treat – – it was different then – – there was a center core – – a strip of caramel, which was surrounded by the peanut butter crisp mixture… It was dipped in milk chocolate, then had a squiggle of milk chocolate that ran the length of the bar… It did become a bar of the crisp, dipped in milk chocolate… It became a dollar store staple – – and I found it in dark, milk and white chocolate varieties, as well as several different sized bars, including a sack of what would have been penny priced when I was a kid…. Butterfingers are a poor cousin, but are found all over the place… Clark commercials made stars of several of the Zoo’s inhabitants – – the Ostrich and the Camel were my favorites, “I want a Clark Bar”….. Now I am off to Amazon, because I really do want a Clark Bar now……

  4. Tom Garvin
    6/23/2017
    Reply

    The mansion in the Fairhaven Plan in North Versailles Twp supposedly was the Clark Mansion on the Clark Farm. I was told that that was owned by the founder of the Clark Bar.

  5. Dr Tom Shultz
    6/25/2017
    Reply

    Excellent article and this is from someone who attended Hershey Medical Center!

  6. Bob Ramsey
    7/14/2017
    Reply

    My grandfather and my father worked at Clark. My father and mother met there. I worked there every summer while I was going to college. Clark bars were a big part of my diet. Thank you for the wonderful memories.

  7. Sandra Jabo
    2/16/2018
    Reply

    My Mother and Aunt worked for Clark’s in and around the early 1920’s. They rode to the Northside on a trolley from Castle Shannon for 4 rides for .25¢. Living at the corner of Provost Rd and Frank’s St in Whitehall they walked to the trolley. Their jobs were packaging Clarks Teaberry Gum. My Mother said the perk was that you could chew as much gum as you wanted. Her stories we’re reminiscent of the “I Love Lucy” candy packing episode with their jaws filled with Teaberry chewing gum.

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