8 Comments

  1. Rey O'Connor
    9/12/2017
    Reply

    Again thank you so much for letting me revisit my hometown of the past. I know it’s not as it once was, but now only for the better. I was a product of the late 30s. and all my family and relatives lived in and around the Northside. No one left but me now (I don’t know how that happened) now turning 80yrs, and I still love my BURGH. Going back to a 60 yr. class reunion next week, and I am fortunate that I still am able to get around and visit the places I knew then (If still standing) and reminiscence of how it was, and look around for me to see and visit on the Northside, Spring garden, Cedar Ave, Pressley St., and many other homes that my aunts and uncles lived in. Will visit the old Gulf Building where my father worked as a Civil Engr. for Gulf Oil. So again, thank you so much, and God Bless.

  2. Helen (Figlar) Lizanov
    9/13/2017
    Reply

    Thank you for bringing back many memories. My husband and I were born and raised in the Crawford St. Section of Duquesne. Now in our 80’s we live in a small town in Texas which has the same community spirit of “Old Duquesne”. We try to visit Pa. each summer for family reunions. Your article was spot on!

  3. Bill Burr
    9/13/2017
    Reply

    Thank’s for the great old stories and pictures! I was born and raised in Castle Shannon. Keep up the good work!

  4. Wendy
    9/14/2017
    Reply

    Thank you for the great story. I always love to read about my hometown and surrounding areas. We had a chance to attend a family reunion this past July and it was wonderful being home and make more memories.

  5. Dennis Ragan
    9/14/2017
    Reply

    My father was a friend of Murt Shaughnessy. Murt was known as a truly wonderful, kind man known for helping others in their time of need. Anyone who knew him considered the man a saint as far as I knew. Although not of Slovak heritage as we Ragans are, Murt was as Slovak (and I’m sure Hungarian, Croatian, Lithuanian, Polish, Italian, German, Serbian, Rusyn … and many more ethnicities) as anyone could be without those ethnic roots. Thanks for sharing this moving story, which I had not heard before, yet falls in line with what we knew about Murt Shaughnessy. I still get to Duquesne now and then — we still have family there, and are proud to have grown up in a town known for its melting pot diversity and vibrancy.

  6. Earl Westerlund Jr.
    9/14/2017
    Reply

    It’s not every day that you open an article and finds out that it’s about your family! Sylvester and Elizabeth Terza are my grandparents. My memory of them was always cheerful. I knew about “Little Johnny” from my mother Nancy, who was 10 at the time of his death. I never really gave him much thought in my clueless childhood days, but this article really drove home the fact that he was a real person, and would have devastated my grandparents as the death of one of my own children would have to me.

    I also knew that Mr. Shaughnessy was well respected, and that Grandpa and the family would work on his cabin in return for some carpentry and maintenance work. I did not know how this arrangement began. What a wonderful man.

    To this day, the Terza clan meets annually for a reunion at Syl and Betty’s own cabin in the mountains near Ligonier. It’s a place that is very important to so many of us.

    Readers, do acts of kindness for others. You have no idea how far they go. Thanks for a wonderful article.

  7. Jim
    9/15/2017
    Reply

    Great story. Great writing. Well done.

  8. Dan Westerlund
    9/16/2017
    Reply

    Wow this is one one the most interesting articles I have ever read. I absolutely love stories about my family… Sylvester and Elizabeth Terza are my great grand parents. I am also a product of the Ragans aswell. So I’m sure I’m related to Dennis. These stories mean so much to me. I hope to be half as good of a person as my family before me. Thank you for a great article.

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