7 Comments

  1. Marlene
    6/14/2018
    Reply

    I, too, fondly remember the Jenkins Arcade … a great place to shop, eat and spend time. But it was an antiquated building and probably not very safe due to it’s electrical and plumbing problems. It was time to let go of the past and move on. We cannot stand in the way of progress.

    • zl
      9/21/2018
      Reply

      Progress = stupidity in this case. Terrible stupidity.

  2. Liz
    6/14/2018
    Reply

    I remember Jenkins’ Arcade well, but it would be considered obsolete today. Having said that, the shops of Fifth Avenue Place are poorly laid out and there has been a lot of turnover in those spaces.

  3. Jeanine
    6/15/2018
    Reply

    It was a unique building with a multiplicity of shops. I miss the place. The only stores to go in downtown Pittsburgh are CVS and Rite Aid. Ha, what progress.

  4. Russ
    6/15/2018
    Reply

    As a former Assistant Property Manager of the Jenkins Arcade (and later a career commercial property professional), I can truly say that the building had outlived its useful life. The 17,000 people per day traffic would have ended when the unattached anchor, Joseph Horne, closed and the retail corridor that was once on Fifth Avenue disappeared. Physically, the building was a mass of disconnected and crossing utility lines, and because of all the dark corners and corridors upstairs, was a security nightmare. People will always have their memories, but it was time for the property to evolve to a higher and better use.

  5. Dale Abraham
    6/17/2018
    Reply

    I dispute the notion that the Jenkins Arcade had outlived its useful life. The idea that the Jenkins Arcade would have failed when Joseph Horne’s went out of business is backward. Horne’s failed because the Jenkins Arcade’s demise failed to deliver the foot traffic that Horne’s needed.

    My dentist was on the 8th floor. Supposedly, the Jenkins Arcade had more sinks than any other building downtown at the time, due to the number of dental offices in the building. I don’t remember any plumbing crises.

    The Highmark building is not a higher and better use. The Jenkins Arcade served the masses in a way that the replacement structure will never do. The building’s demise was one of the first steps in ripping the fabric of the downtown retail shopping experience. The destruction of the Jenkins Arcade, even in 2018, is unforgivable.

    Highmark could have chosen any number of other blocks to build their skyscraper. Instead, they chose to destroy a beloved monument that Pittsburghers held in great revere.
    Sincerely,
    Dale Abraham

  6. Tim Murphy
    7/27/2018
    Reply

    Never thought I’d see a letter that I wrote 35 years ago reappear. I mourned the loss of the Jenkins Arcade at the time and still feel the same! I live near Columbia South Carolina now & the Equitable Arcade building on Main Street reminds me of the Jenkins building. Thanks for the memories.

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