This is what happened next

Leer en español

Mike Gonzalez couldn’t get the old man out of his head. He had seen many damaged houses in the mountainous streets of Cayey, yet the man sitting in his roofless home stayed with him.

When Gonzalez arrived at the house carrying emergency supplies, the man was sitting on a plastic lawn chair. It was where, Gonzalez figured, he would eat, sleep, do anything, do nothing. Surrounding the chair was about a foot of water. The man’s other furniture lay in front of the house, soaking wet and filled with mildew.

“He’s just sitting there by himself, no family, in that lawn chair, in complete darkness,” Gonzalez said. “No electricity, no water, no roof.”

That was 15 days after Hurricane Maria tore through Cayey. About an hour later, it started raining again.


A horse stands in front of debris on a street in Caguas. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

A horse stands in front of debris on a street in Caguas. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

On Dec. 31, 1972, Roberto Clemente died off the coast of Puerto Rico while flying to aid earthquake-ravaged Nicaragua. When Hurricane Maria descended upon Puerto Rico 45 years later, the Pirates, inspired by Clemente’s work, sprang into action. In early October, the team held a hurricane relief collection outside of PNC Park, and two days later, a small delegation flew to Puerto Rico with Pittsburgh’s donations.

Their trip brought them to the cities of Cayey and Caguas, where the Pirates’ extensive Puerto Rican connections run especially deep. Gonzalez — the Pirates’ special assistant to the general manager for cultural initiatives, who is best known to fans as the team’s Spanish interpreter — grew up in Cayey until he was 11. Third-base coach Joey Cora and his brother, Alex, the manager of the Boston Red Sox, are well known in their native Caguas.

 

On their missions from and to Puerto Rico, Roberto Clemente and the Pirates recognized that supplies were not getting to those who needed them. Their missions separated by decades, their legacies forever linked, the Pirates and the Clementes overlapped again last fall.

Manny Sanguillen and the Pirates provided generators, batteries and other supplies to Clemente’s widow, Vera. One of the Clementes’ sons, Luis, was at the airport awaiting the Pirates, and he joined Joey Cora in Caguas to open boxes of supplies.

When Cora asked around about who could help the Pirates with the complicated logistics of their project, there was only one answer: Raul Rodriguez, the president of a pharmaceutical company in Puerto Rico, who also owns a winter league baseball team called the Criollos de Caguas. Former Criollos players include Ivan Rodriguez, Roberto Clemente — and Alex Cora, who also was the team’s general manager and whose number it recently retired.

Nine months after the storm hit, Puerto Rico remains devastated by Hurricane Maria, and the full extent of the damage is not yet known. While the official death toll in Puerto Rico is 64, a recent survey from Harvard University estimates that the hurricane had taken 4,645 lives.


Raul Rodriguez is president of Luis Garraton Inc., a logistics company in Puerto Rico with which the Pirates worked to distribute emergency supplies after Hurricane Maria. Here, he directs a group of people packing relief supplies earlier this year at his warehouse in Caguas. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Raul Rodriguez is president of Luis Garraton Inc., a logistics company in Puerto Rico with which the Pirates worked to distribute emergency supplies after Hurricane Maria. Here, he directs a group of people packing relief supplies earlier this year at his warehouse in Caguas. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

The Pirates’ delegation — Gonzalez, Cora, Francisco Cervelli, Sean Rodriguez and owner Bob Nutting, among others — arrived in Puerto Rico the Thursday after the 2017 season had concluded. The group helped unload the plane, and the supplies were sent to one of Raul Rodriguez’s warehouses. Cora, Gonzalez and Sean Rodriguez continued on to the warehouse to sort goods, while Cervelli, recovering from a minor procedure to remove a cyst, returned to the U.S. mainland.

“Mike and Joey went to our warehouse, to our distribution center, and they were there until 2 in the morning,” Raul Rodriguez said. “They wanted to know how we did this, you know. And they wanted to know, look, ‘I want to be sure that that’s going to be taken to our people.’ ”

Eliezer Santiago Rivera, the grandfather of Mike Gonzalez, the Pirates’ special assistant to the general manager for cultural initiatives, stands outside of El Deportivo Rental in Cayey, Puerto Rico, on Jan. 30. El Deportivo Rental, a store, was a site of distribution for the Pirates’ relief efforts after Hurricane Maria. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Eliezer Santiago Rivera, the grandfather of Mike Gonzalez, the Pirates’ special assistant to the general manager for cultural initiatives, stands outside of El Deportivo Rental in Cayey, Puerto Rico, on Jan. 30. El Deportivo Rental, a store, was a site of distribution for the Pirates’ relief efforts after Hurricane Maria. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Gonzalez and Sean Rodriguez stayed the night with Gonzalez’s grandfather, Eliezer Santiago Rivera, then headed to the Cayey baseball stadium to start their distribution. Gonzalez was surprised at the early-morning traffic; after all, nobody could work. “This is for you guys,” his grandfather told him, and Gonzalez saw thousands of people wrapped around the stadium.

The city of Cayey turned the ballpark into an emergency center, complete with a breast milk bank, Section 8 assistance and a restaurant. Cayey’s mayor, Rolando Ortiz, slept there every night, in a small room perhaps intended for umpires. A municipal employee would travel to San Juan early each morning to pick up newspapers, pasting photocopies of the most important articles on easels in case they ran out.

“They weren’t selling newspapers because nobody had cash, or nobody could go to the stores and get the newspapers, so they would give them to us for free,” said Gretchen M. Hau, the executive director of the Puerto Rico Mayors Association, who worked with Ortiz and the Pirates on the relief mission.

The city also set up a restaurant so that the people could get a hot meal; it was eventually closed in an effort to spur demand at the local supermarkets, Hau said. All were welcome to the restaurant — even swarms of bees desperate for sustenance in the wake of the hurricane.

“They had no vegetation, so they would see here food and they would find sugar,” Hau said. “You cannot kill them, because they’re the ones who make the vegetation bloom again.”


Gabriela Gaviria Beltran stands inside of El Deportivo Rental in Cayey. She is married to the grandfather of Mike Gonzalez, the Pirates’ special assistant to the general manager for cultural initiatives. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Gabriela Gaviria Beltran stands inside of El Deportivo Rental in Cayey. She is married to the grandfather of Mike Gonzalez, the Pirates’ special assistant to the general manager for cultural initiatives. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

The Pirates wanted to be sure their supplies went to the people who needed it, but they also encountered examples of red tape, corruption and looting that has dogged Puerto Rico since the hurricane. At the airport, they saw supplies that had been broken into and untouched containers filled with supplies waiting to be distributed. One of the drivers told Gonzalez that his generator — a prized commodity after the storm — was taken in the middle of the night and replaced with a lawnmower that produced a similar noise. Another driver told him that someone had siphoned the gasoline from his tank.

Outside of his wedding day and the birth of his son, Gonzalez said, the trip was the most special experience of his life, but there is one part Gonzalez tries to forget. At the stadium, someone approached Gonzalez and asked for a generator, saying he was a good friend of his grandfather’s.

Gonzalez was confused. The guy was not talking like a friend, and others in the vicinity were giving him mixed signals as to how to respond. Gonzalez decided to take the request to the mayor, and the man followed Gonzalez.

The mayor stiffened when he saw the man, who turned out to be a well known gangster, and on the mayor’s advice they decided to give him a generator.

“He was like, ‘Look, it’s better to give him the generator because if not, a lot of this would have been affected and hurt because of this man,’ ” Gonzalez said. “Our whole mission could have gone sour if we would have just said no to a generator.”


Sean Rodriguez and Mike Gonzalez. (Courtesy Mike Gonzalez)

Sean Rodriguez and Mike Gonzalez. (Courtesy Mike Gonzalez)

After leaving the ballpark, Gonzalez and Sean Rodriguez distributed supplies door to door, sitting in the bed of a pickup truck as it wound through the narrow, mountainous roads of Cayey. The rain returned, and a sewage system already plugged by debris backed up again, flooding the streets anew. Their Clemente T-shirts became sopping wet, so they gave them away and borrowed clean ones.

Gonzalez paid a visit to his other grandfather, a war veteran and a bit of a recluse. Nobody had heard from him since the hurricane.

“No one knew if he was alive, if he wasn’t, if he was there, if he wasn’t, if he went with someone else,” Gonzalez said. “No one knew anything.”

He knocked on the door. No one answered.

“Abuelo,” Gonzalez said, “it’s me, Miquito.”

His grandfather opened the door. They embraced and cried.


Courtesy Mike Gonzalez

Courtesy Mike Gonzalez

The evening ended at El Deportivo Rental, a store owned by Gilberto Bonilla, who is also the leader of one of Cayey’s neighborhoods. Bonilla had gone door to door to tell residents that the relief was coming, and residents flocked to his store — something of a cross between a bar and a convenience store — to accept the supplies.

“Three or four guys just hopped on the truck and just started handing stuff out,” Sean Rodriguez said. “It was bad, in a sense where if we didn’t do that, the people might have just started to lose it.”

Then, it became like any other weekend night. Shop employees cooked up meals for the residents. People danced salsa. Bonilla brought Gonzalez and Rodriguez two bottles of Heineken.

“Cold, too,” Rodriguez said. “That moment, just so much more than just a simple cold beer.”


Pedro Montañez Stadium in Cayey, Puerto Rico, is the site of the city's emergency operations. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

A man requests help at Pedro Montañez Stadium in Cayey on Jan. 30. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Caguas is known as the Centro y Corazon de Puerto Rico, but even the center and heart of Puerto Rico was not safe from the eye of the storm. Joey Cora stayed at his brother’s house, which was leaking and had neither electricity nor water. He told Alex, then the bench coach for the World Series-bound Houston Astros, that he’d have to use his playoff money to fix things up.

“In the moment of more need and desperation, they came.”

The Caguas distribution took place at a volleyball gym. An elaborate, multi-level line started forming at 3 in the morning, and it was so long it had to be cut off in the afternoon, said Cora, who spotted one of his best friends in the queue. When it started getting dark, the group brought three cars into the gym and turned on the headlights.

Caguas had received limited supplies from FEMA, Mayor Willie Miranda said. By contrast, the Pirates’ relief effort felt like shopping at a supermarket, and several thousand families were served.

“We were having a frustration about [how] things were moving,” Miranda said. “In the moment of more need and desperation, they came.”

After it was over, Cora went to his sister’s house to unwind. They had communicated once by text and with a long-forgotten rotary phone that was connected underground, but they hadn’t seen each other. They drank water, and Cora went home to beat the curfew established after the hurricane.


Lourma Sullivan, sub-director of sports and recreation for Caguas, Puerto Rico, gives a tour of a sports facility that was ruined during Hurricane Maria. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

A hurricane-damaged building stands on a road near Caguas in late January. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

There was no way, Cora thought, that the Puerto Rican baseball teams would play in the months after Hurricane Maria, but Raul Rodriguez was undeterred.

“He told us when we went there that they were going to try to play,” Cora said. “I said, ‘Really?’ ”

The hurricane shortened the season but did not impede it altogether. Rodriguez’s Criollos de Caguas played just 18 games, none at their home stadium, which had sporadic power and no water. Cora watched the games online; admission was free.

“He was the one that came with that crazy idea, ‘We need to play,’ ” Cora said of Rodriguez. “That’s him, though. That’s the way he works.”

In the storm-shortened season in January, the Criollos — the team, at various times, of Alex Cora, of Roberto Clemente, of Raul Rodriguez — posted an 11-7 record, the best in the Puerto Rican league. In February, the team traveled to Mexico for the Caribbean Series, and the Criollos defeated the Dominican Republic to win their second consecutive Caribbean championship.

“That’s the icing on the cake, you know?” Cora said. “That was good.”


This communications tower outside of Parque Yldefonso Sola Morales, the baseball stadium in Caguas, folded over during Hurricane Maria. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

This communications tower outside of Parque Yldefonso Sola Morales, the baseball stadium in Caguas, folded over during Hurricane Maria. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

When Maria hit, Luis Clemente and his family went to his mother’s house in Rio Piedras. He wanted to keep her company, and in any case, his apartment didn’t have shutters.

A couple of months after the hurricane, Vera went to Virginia to spend time with her son, Roberto Jr., and her friend Carol Bass, who was with Vera when she learned that her husband’s plane had crashed. For now, though, the Clementes would endure the storm together.

After the hurricane, Luis Clemente said, Puerto Rico looked as though it had endured a cold snap. The storm had ripped the leaves off all the trees. He saw houses in the neighborhood he didn’t know existed. As the storm raged on, a bird stood underneath a bridge outside of Vera’s home, looking lost.

“You see that he was very disoriented,” Clemente said. “You know, trying to see, kind of like, ‘Should I fly? Should I stay?’

“So,” Clemente said, “I guess he felt he had protection there.”

Reporting Elizabeth Bloom | ebloom@post-gazette.com | Twitter @BloomPG
Translation Mark Fried
Design and development Zack Tanner
Read in English

Mike Gonzalez no dejaba de pensar en el viejo. Por las empinadas calles alrededor de Cayey había visto muchas casas dañadas, pero la imagen del señor sentado en su casa sin techo se le quedó grabada .

Cuando González llegó a esa casa con ayuda de urgencia, el hombre se encontraba sentado en una silla plegable de plástico. Es llí, pensó González, donde el tendria que comer, dormír, hacer de todo, no hacer nada. Al rededor de la silla había agua de unas doce pulgadas de profundidad. Lo que quedó de sus muebles estaba frente a la casa, empapado y enmojecido.

“El estaba sentado allí solito, sin familia, en su silla plegable, en la oscuridad total,” dijo González. “Sin electricidad, sin agua, sin techo.”

Eso fue 15 días después del día en que el Huracán María destrozó a Cayey. Una hora más tarde, más o menos, comenzó a llover nuevamente.


Un caballo adelante de los escombros en una calle de Caguas, Puerto Rico, el lunes 29 enero. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Un caballo adelante de los escombros en una calle de Caguas, Puerto Rico, el lunes 29 enero. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

El 31 de diciembre de 1972, murió Roberto Clemente cerca a las costas de Puerto Rico cuando viajaba en avion a Nicaragua repleto de ayuda para las víctimas del terremoto en ese pais. Cuando el Huracán María revertió su furia sobre Puerto Rico 45 años más tarde, los Pirates, inspirados por la bondad y el ejemplo de Clemente, se lanzaron a la labor. A principios de octubre el equipo realizó una colección de ayuda fuera del Parque PNC, y dos días después una pequeña delegación se embarco para Puerto Rico con las provisiones de Pittsburgh.

El viaje los llevó a las ciudades de Cayey y Caguas, donde los extensos contactos locales de los Pirates son marcadamente profundas. González—el asistente especial para iniciativas culturales del gerente general, quien es más conocido a los fanáticos como el intérprete español-inglés del equipo—es oriundo de Cayey, donde creció hasta los once años. Bien conocidos en su Caguas nativo son el entrenador de tercera base Joey Cora y su hermano Alex, el manager de las Medias Rojas de Boston.

Mientras la cifra oficial de muertes es 64, un sondeo realizado recientemente por la Universidad de Harvard estimó que el huracán cobró 4,645 vidas.

Las misiones tanto de Roberto Clemente como de los Pirates fueron motivados por el temor de que las provisiones de ayuda de emergencia no estaban llegando a los más necesitados. Aunque separados por décadas, dichas misiones estarian ligadas para siempre, y su respectivo legado se reconectaron de nuevo en otoño pasado.

Manny Sanguillén y los Pirates suministraron generadores, pilas y otros bienes a Vera Clemente, la viuda de Roberto. Uno de los hijos de los Clemente, Luis, esperaba en el aeropuerto cuando los Pirates llegaron, y al llegar a Caguas él, junto a Joey Cora, se pusieron a abrir las cajas de provisiones.

Cuando Cora preguntó quien podría ayudar a los Pirates con la complicada logística de su proyecto, surgio una sola respuesta: Raúl Rodríguez, el presidente de una compañía farmacéutica en Puerto Rico, quien también es dueño de un equipo de beisbol llamado los Criollos de Caguas de la liga invernal. Entre los jugadores de los Criollos de épocas pasadas se encuentran Iván Rodríguez, Roberto Clemente y Alex Cora. Este último fue el gerente general del equipo y su número fue retirado hace poco.

Nueve meses después de la tormenta, Puerto Rico sigue devastado, y no se sabe todavía con certeza el alcance de la devastación. Mientras la cifra oficial de muertes es 64, pero un recuento en base a un sondeo realizado recientemente por la Universidad de Harvard estimó que el huracán cobró 4,645 vidas.


Raúl Rodríguez es el presidente de Luis Garratón, Inc., una compañía de logística en Puerto Rico con la cual los Pirates colaboró para la distribución de provisiones de urgencia después del Huracán María. El lunes 29 enero, él dirige un grupo que empaca provisiones de ayuda en su bodega en Caguas, Puerto Rico. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Raúl Rodríguez es el presidente de Luis Garratón, Inc., una compañía de logística en Puerto Rico con la cual los Pirates colaboró para la distribución de provisiones de urgencia después del Huracán María. El lunes 29 enero, él dirige un grupo que empaca provisiones de ayuda en su bodega en Caguas, Puerto Rico. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

La delegación de los Pirates—que incluyó a González, Cora, Francisco Cervelli, Sean Rodríguez y el dueño Bob Nutting, entre otros—llegó a Puerto Rico el jueves después de la conclusión de la temporada de 2017. El grupo ayudó a descargar el avión y las provisiones fueron enviadas a una de las bodegas de Raúl Rodríguez. Cora, González y Sean Rodríguez siguieron allí para poner las provisiones en orden, mientras Cervelli, quien se estaba recuperando de una operación para sacarle un quiste, regresó a Pittsburgh.

“Mike y Joey llegaron a nuestra bodega, a nuestro centro de distribución, y estaban allí hasta las dos de la mañana,” dijo Raúl Rodríguez. “Ellos querían aprender cómo lo hacemos, tu sabes. Y querían saber, mira, ‘Quiero estar seguro de que esto va a llegar a nuestro pueblo.’”

Eliezar Santiago Rivera, el abuelo de Mike González, el asistente especial para iniciativas culturales del gerente general de los Pirates, fuera de El Deportivo Rental en Cayey, Puerto Rico el martes 30 enero 2018. La tienda fue el lugar de distribución de la ayuda enviada por los Pirates después del Huracán María.

Eliezar Santiago Rivera, el abuelo de Mike González, el asistente especial para iniciativas culturales del gerente general de los Pirates, fuera de El Deportivo Rental en Cayey, Puerto Rico el martes 30 enero 2018. La tienda fue el lugar de distribución de la ayuda enviada por los Pirates después del Huracán María. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

González y Sean Rodríguez se quedaron la noche con el abuelo de González, Eliezer Santiago Rivera, y luego se fueron al estadio de Cayey para empezar con la distribución. González se sorprendió al ver tanto tráfico temprano en la mañana en vista de que nadie podía ir a trabajar. “Esto es para ustedes,” le dijo su abuelo, y González vio que miles de personas estaban al rededor del estadio.

El gobierno municipal de Cayey convertió el estadio de beisbol en un centro de emergencia que hasta contaba con un banco de leche maternal, ayuda de la Sección 8 y un restaurante. El alcalde, Rolando Ortiz, durmió allí cada noche en una pequeña habitación que quizás fue construida para los árbitros. Un empleado municipal viajaba a San Juan temprano cada mañana para recoger los periódicos, y en caso de que no daban abasto colgaba fotocopias de los artículos más importantes en caballetes.

“No vendían periódicos porque nadie tenía dinero en efectivo, o nadie podía salir a las tiendas a comprarlos, así que se los regalaba,” dijo Gretchen M. Hau, la directora ejecutiva de la Asociación de Alcaldes de Puerto Rico, quien colaboraba con Ortiz y los Pirates en su misión caritativa.

La ciudad también ofreció un servicio de restaurante para que la gente pudiera comer algo caliente. Eventualmente lo cerraron a fin de incrementar la demanda en los supermercados locales, dijo Hau. Todos eran bienvenidos en el restaurante— inclusive los enjambres de abejas desesperadas que buscaban alimento después del huracán.

“No había vegetación, así que al ver la comida aquí venían y encontraban azúcar,” dijo Hau. “No las puedes matar porque son ellas quienes permiten que la vegetación vuelve a retoñar.”


Gabriela Gaviria Beltrán dentro de El Deportivo Rental en Cayey, Puerto Rico, el martes 30  enero. La tienda fue el lugar de distribución de la ayuda enviada por los Pirates después del Huracán María. Ella está casada con el abuelo de Mike González, el asistente especial para iniciativas culturales del gerente general de los Pirates de Pittsburgh.

Gabriela Gaviria Beltrán dentro de El Deportivo Rental en Cayey, Puerto Rico, el martes 30 enero. La tienda fue el lugar de distribución de la ayuda enviada por los Pirates después del Huracán María. Ella está casada con el abuelo de Mike González, el asistente especial para iniciativas culturales del gerente general de los Pirates de Pittsburgh. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Los Pirates querían asegurarse que las provisiones llegasen a los necesitados, pero también encontraron instancias de trámites engorrosos, corrupción y robo que han causado problemas en Puerto Rico desde que el ciclón golpeo a la isla. En el aeropuerto vieron cajas de provisiones violadas y contenedores intactos y llenos sin distribuir. Uno de los choferes contó a González que su generador—algo muy cotizado después de la tormenta—fue robado en la noche y el motor de una máquina para cortar el césped, que hacía un ruido similar, habia sido dejado en su reemplazo. Otro chofer le dijo que alguien había sacado el combustible de su tanque.

Fuera de su boda y el del nacimiento de su hijo, González dijo, el viaje fue la experiencia más especial de su vida. Sin embargo, existe un episodio que González preferiría olvidar. En el estadio, alguien se le acercó y pidió un generador, diciendo que era muy amigo de su abuelo.

Rolando Ortiz, mayor of Cayey

González se sintió turbado. Este tipo no hablaba como amigo, y otras personas cercanas le hacían señales contradictorias de cómo debía responder. González decidió llevar la petición al alcalde, y el hombre le siguió.

El alcalde se erizó cuando vio quien era, y resultó ser un gangster conocido. Siguiendo el consejo del alcalde, decidieron darle el generador.

“Él decía, bueno, ‘Mejor sería darle el generador porque si no, este hombre hubiera afectado y dañado mucho a este esfuerzo,’” González dijo. “Nuestra misión entera podría haberse estropeado si hubiéramos dicho que no.”


Sean Rodriguez y Mike Gonzalez. (Cortesía de Mike Gonzalez)

Sean Rodriguez y Mike Gonzalez. (Cortesía de Mike Gonzalez)

Después de que salieron del estadio, González y Sean Rodríguez distribuyeron provisiones puerta a puerta, desde la parte posterior de una camioneta pick up siguiendo las rutas montañosas de Cayey. Comenzó de nuevo a llover y el sistema de desagüe ya congestionado por escombros, se atascó por enésima vez, inundando las calles. Sus camisetas con la imagen de Clemente se empaparon, así que se las regalaron y pidieron prestadas otras limpias.

González hizo una visita a su otro abuelo, un veterano de guerra y algo recluso. Nadie tenia noticias de él desde la devastadora tormenta.

“Nadie sabía si estaba vivo o no, si estaba allí o no, o si se había refugiado con alguna otra persona,” González dijo. “Nadie sabía nada.”

Tocó la puerta. Nadie respondió.

“Abuelo,” González dijo, “soy yo, Miquito.”

Su abuelo abrió la puerta. Se abrazaron y empesaron a llorar.


Cortesía de Mike Gonzalez

Cortesía de Mike Gonzalez

La noche terminó en Deportivo Rental, una tienda propiedad de Gilberto Bonilla, quien es también dirigente de una vecindad de Cayey. Bonilla había ido de puerta en puerta para avisar a los residentes que la ayuda venía, y la gente llegó a su tienda—que funciona como una cantina y bodega a la vez—para recibir las provisiones.

“Tres o cuatro hombres se montaron en la parte tracera de la camioneta y de inmediato comenzaron a repartir cosas,” dijo Sean Rodríguez. “Estaba mal, en el sentido de que si no lo hacíamos nosotros, la gente podía haber enloquecido.”

“Después, la noche volvió a ser como cualquier otra noche de fin de semana. Los empleados de la tienda cocinaron para los residentes. La gente bailaba salsa. Bonilla llevó dos botellas de Heineken a González y Rodríguez.

“Frías estaban, también,” dijo Rodríguez. “En ese momento era tanto más que una cerveza fría.”


Parque de Beisbol Pedro Montañez en Cayey, Puerto Rico, el martes 30 enero 2018. El estadio es ahora el centro de operaciones de emergencia de la ciudad. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Un señor pide ayuda en el Parque de Beisbol Pedro Montañez en Cayey, Puerto Rico, el martes 30 enero. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Caguas es conocido como el centro y corazón de Puerto Rico, pero no se salvó de la tormenta. Esa noche Joey Cora se quedó en casa de su hermano, que goteaba del techo y no tenía ni luz ni agua. Joey le dijo a Alex, quien en ese momento era el coach del banquillo de los Houston Astros, quienes estaban por clacificarse para la Serie Mundial, que tendría que utilizar su bonificacion por los playoffs para poder arreglar la casa.

“En un momento de mucha necesidad y desesperación, ellos llegaron.”

La distribución de viveres en Caguas ocurrió en un gimnasio de voleibol. Una fila complicada de muchos niveles comenzó a formarse a las tres de la madrugada, y era tan larga que tuvieron que cortarla por la tarde, dijo Cora, quien vio a uno de sus mejores amigos en la fila. Cuando empezó a oscurecer, el grupo metió tres carros en el gimnasio y prendieron los faros para alumbrar.

Caguas había recibido pocos recursos de FEMA, dijo el alcalde Willie Miranda. Por el contrario, las provisiones de los Pirates parecía un supermercado, y varios miles de familias fueron servidas.

“Sentíamos frustración por la manera cómo iban las cosas,” Miranda dijo. “En un momento de mucha necesidad y desesperación, ellos llegaron.”

Después de la distribución, Cora fue a casa de su hermana para descansar. Se habían comunicado una vez por text y con un olvidado teléfono de rueda conectada bajo tierra, pero no se habían visto. Tomaron agua, y Cora regresó a casa para evitar el toque de queda establecido después del ciclón.


Lourma Sullivan, la directora asociada de deporte y recreación de la ciudad de Caguas, Puerto Rico, durante una visita a una instalación deportiva arruinada por el Huracán María el lunes 29 enero. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Un edificio dañado en el huracán por un camino cerca a Caguas, Puerto Rico, el 28 enero. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

No hay manera, pensó Cora, que los equipos puertorriqueños podrían jugar en durante los meses después de golpear el Huracán María, pero Raúl Rodríguez no se daba por vencido

“Nos dijo cuando estábamos ahí que iban a intentar jugar,” dijo Cora. “Le dije, ‘¿De verdad?’”

El ciclón acortó la temporada pero no puso fin a ella. Los Criollos de Caguas de Rodríguez jugaron solamente 18 juegos, y ninguno en su estadio que solamente tenía luz esporádicamente y nada de agua. Cora miró los juegos por internet; la entrada era gratis.

“Él era quien inventó esa idea loca de que debemos jugar,” dijo Cora de Rodríguez. “Así es él. Así funciona.”

En la temporada acortada por el ciclón, que se realizó en enero, los Criollos—el equipo que era en un momento u otro el de Alex Cora, de Roberto Clemente y de Raúl Rodríguez—logró un balance de 11-7, el mejor de la liga puertorriqueña. En febrero el equipo viajó a México para la Serie del Caribe, y los Criollos le ganaron a la República Dominicana y asi lograron el campeonato caribeño por segunda vez consecutiva.

“Eso fue la guinda del pastel, ¿tu sabes?” dijo Cora. “Eso estuvo bien.”


Una torre de comunicaciones fuera del Parque Yldefonso Sola Morales, el estadio de beisbol de Caguas, Puerto Rico, el lunes 29 enero. La torre se dobló durante el Huracán María. El estadio no puede usarse por el momento y el equipo, los Criollos de Caguas, tuvieron que jugar en otra parte. Sin embargo, el equipo ganó el campeonato de Puerto Rico y la Serie del Caribe en 2018. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Una torre de comunicaciones fuera del Parque Yldefonso Sola Morales, el estadio de beisbol de Caguas, Puerto Rico, el lunes 29 enero. La torre se dobló durante el Huracán María. El estadio no puede usarse por el momento y el equipo, los Criollos de Caguas, tuvieron que jugar en otra parte. Sin embargo, el equipo ganó el campeonato de Puerto Rico y la Serie del Caribe en 2018. (Elizabeth Bloom/Post-Gazette)

Cuando llegó el Huracán María, Luis Clemente y su familia se refugiaron en la casa de su madre en Rio Piedras. Quería acompañarla y en todo caso su propio departamento no tenía protectores contraventanas.

Un par de meses después de la tormenta, Vera (la viuda de Roberto) fue a Virginia para pasar un tiempo con su hijo Roberto, Jr. y su amiga Carol Bass, quien estuvo con Vera cuando aquella se enteró de que el avión que llevaba su esposo se había caído. En el momento del ciclón, sin embargo, los Clemente decidieron quedarse a enfrentar la tormenta juntos.

Luis Clemente dijo que después del ciclón Puerto Rico se veía como si hubiera pasado una ola de frío. La tormenta había quitado todas las hojas de los árboles. En el vecindario de repente aparecieron casas que él no conocía. Durante la tempestad, un pájaro estuvo parado debajo de un puente fuera de la casa de Vera, parecia que estaba perdido.

“Se notaba su desorientación,” dijo Clemente. “Tu sabes, intentaba mirar, como preguntándose ‘¿Debo volar? ¿Debo quedarme?’”

“Bueno,” Clemente dijo, “Supongo que se sentía algo protegido allí.”

Informes Elizabeth Bloom | ebloom@post-gazette.com | Twitter @BloomPG
Traducción Mark Fried
Diseño y desarrollo Zack Tanner


Advertisement


Advertisement

Comments