The OD of an alumnus. The cry of a student with a parent in addiction. The community’s opioid cloud. Schools are waking up to the epidemic.

Spenser Flowers went from homecoming king to overdose victim in 27 months. At the Hampton Township School District, his death hammered home the reality that even if there’s no sign of pills or stamp bags in the halls or bleachers, graduates will soon run into opioids, some will try them, and a few will die.

“You’re haunted by that: Someone so young, dying from something that could’ve been prevented,” said Hampton’s high school principal, Marguerite Imbarlina. “That was somewhat of a wake-up call. … We need to try every avenue, because every kid is different.”

That wake-up call led to, among other things, a Jan. 18 summit at which multiple levels of government, including the schools, joined with clergy and medical professionals in a partnership to fight the epidemic.

A photo of Spenser Flowers as homecoming king at Hampton Township High School in 2014 is surrounded by other photos from his life at his parents' home. (Stephanie Strasburg/Post-Gazette)

A photo of Spenser Flowers as homecoming king at Hampton Township High School in 2014 is surrounded by other photos from his life at his parents’ home. (Stephanie Strasburg/Post-Gazette)

Forming such a coalition is just one of a dizzying set of options for districts accustomed to deterring drug use on their grounds, but increasingly expected to do something harder: Give students the tools to avoid addiction in adulthood.

“Schools are the ideal setting in order to intervene in a child’s life and ensure that they’re getting the services and attention that they need,” said Diana Fishbein, a Penn State University professor of human development and president of the National Prevention Science Coalition to Improve Lives.

Some, but not all, school drug prevention approaches are proven to work, she added. “Some will do more harm than good. Some will do nothing, and just waste money.”

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette asked the region’s biggest school systems about their approaches to drug prevention. Some have policies focused on punishing violators, while others stress rehabilitation. Anti-drug assemblies featuring police compete for student attention with guest lectures by addiction doctors or recovering addicts. A few schools use proven, evidence-based prevention programs, while most adopt less-studied curricula. The vast majority stock naloxone, which can reverse an opioid overdose.

Much of it comes against the backdrop of tight budgets and pressure to improve test scores.

“I know that our schools are all feeling pressure to perform academically,” said Rick Birt, acting CEO of Students Against Destructive Decisions, a Washington, D.C.-based membership organization with chapters in the North Allegheny, Seneca Valley, Armstrong, Peters Township and North Hills districts. “But there’s nothing more important than the health and safety of the student population.”

“Consequences? Later.”

Around one in 24 high school seniors surveyed reported misusing prescription opioids last year, and one in 250 admitted to using heroin, according to national data released in December by the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

And Spenser Flowers? Did he use in high school? His mother, an attorney who has also launched a charitable fund called Spenser’s Voice, doesn’t know.

He was a church youth group leader, lifeguard and honor student. When he graduated in 2015, said his mother, attorney Tina Flowers, “I don’t think anybody knew much about this epidemic.” He headed off to Temple University.

In August 2016, though, Hampton police arrested him for careless driving while using unprescribed Xanax. He tried rehab, but on the following New Year’s Day, his family found him dead on his bedroom floor, from an overdose of heroin and fentanyl.

“Is it a choice, or is it a disease?” Thomas Brophy asked, just over a year later, in a Hampton chemistry class. An addiction medicine doctor from the area, he went straight to the science.

Opioids, he told the class, stimulate the pleasure system at the center of the brain. Gradually, the parts of the brain that handle long-term thinking get less and less use. The result? “You cannot rationally talk an opiate addict out of picking up,” he said. “They only think, ‘This solves my problem. I’m going to take it. Consequences? Later.'”

Dr. Brophy’s presentation wasn’t the old-school, Drug Abuse Resistance Education — or D.A.R.E. — approach. It was scary in a just-the-facts way. Hampton has used other approaches, too, bringing in the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, people recovering from addiction, and mourning parents.

“We’re not going to pretend that Hampton, or the North Hills, doesn’t have a problem with this,” said Superintendent Michael Loughead. “This is an epidemic, this is a serious problem, and we’re trying to hit it head-on.”

Hampton’s ZIP Code, 15101, has seen 27 fatal overdoses since 2008, including at least four last year. In that same decade, the county as a whole tallied 3,548 fatal overdoses. Less than 1 percent were under 18. However, 8 percent were in the 18-24 age group.

“Do you think it’s a disease, or do you think it’s a choice?” Dr. Brophy asked at the end of class. The projector then flashed a slide reading: “Does it matter?”

What works, and what doesn’t

This question matters: How can addiction be prevented?

“The programs that frighten people, that shock, that intimidate — those do not work,” said Janet Welsh, an assistant professor at Penn State, who runs the Prevention Center in the College of Health and Human Development.

The big anti-drug assembly might be a waste of time.

“Kids don’t want to sit in an inactive classroom or an inactive assembly and be lectured at. They’re not interested in hearing about long-term health effects. Their brains simply don’t work that way,” said Kellie Henrichs, a trainer at Prevention First, a nonprofit based in Springfield, Ill., that trains community organizations to encourage drug-free youth.

 

Starting early is important, she said. “The age of first use, we’re really looking at 13 being a critical time period for young people.”

Multiple Choices

The region’s largest school districts take a wide range of approaches to drug prevention, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette found, after surveying 22 big school systems. (Fox Chapel Area School District and Penn-Trafford School District did not respond.) Below, green means yes, red means no, and click on the links to the right to see the district’s policy and its own account of its drug prevention events, curricula and policies.

School district or charter Schools stock naloxone? Does school policy emphasize student rehabilitation? Does school policy call for parental notification of drug violations? Does school policy discuss drug testing of students? Does school policy contemplate calling law enforcement? Does school policy clearly outline punishments for violations? Official policy School input
Pittsburgh SD
Pennsylvania Cyber CS
North Allegheny SD
Butler Area SD
Seneca Valley SD
Hempfield Area SD
Armstrong SD
Mt Lebanon SD
Norwin SD
Canon-McMillan SD
Shaler Area SD
Pine-Richland SD
Connellsville Area SD
Bethel Park SD
Peters Township SD
North Hills SD
Upper Saint Clair SD
Baldwin-Whitehall SD
Greater Latrobe SD
Plum Borough SD
School district or charter Schools stock naloxone? Does school policy emphasize student rehabilitation? Does school policy call for parental notification of drug violations? Does school policy discuss drug testing of students? Does school policy contemplate calling law enforcement? Does school policy clearly outline punishments for violations? Official policy School input
 Yes No Cyber school, no instructional buildings

The effective programs are realistic about the prevalence of drug use, teach kids techniques for refusing substances, focus on self-esteem and self-management, demonstrate problem solving and instill emotional control and social skills, according to Sharon Mihalic, director of the Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development project at the University of Colorado. Her project reviews all of the studies on programs meant to help young people, and puts the results on an easy-to-use website.

Blueprints identifies a dozen school drug prevention programs that have been proven to be effective at reducing the likelihood that students will use in the future.

One proven program, called LifeSkills Training, starts in elementary school and is used in Seneca Valley, Greater Latrobe and Plum. It is one of the only proven,evidence-based drug prevention programs showing up in southwestern Pennsylvania’s largest districts, according to the Post-Gazette’s survey.

LifeSkills includes drug resistance, but also instructs kids in handling social situations, managing their impulses, “dealing with their emotions, communicating effectively, being more assertive,” said Paulina Kalaj, communications director at National Health Promotion Associates, which sells the curriculum.

“When you teach kids these skills, they’re more likely to engage in healthy behavior across the board,” she said. “Studies have showed that our program not only works, but works 12 years after students have received the program.”

LifeSkills costs districts around $6 per student, she said.

Schools can apply to various state funds to cover costs, but such awards eventually expire, forcing administrators to “spend a lot of time and energy jumping from one grant to another trying to keep the ship sailing,” said Ms. Welsh.

There’s free help available, but in Allegheny County, most districts don’t take it.

“When you teach kids these skills, they’re more likely to engage in healthy behavior across the board.”

Allegheny County’s Department of Human Services writes annually to the county’s 43 school districts, offering them state-funded drug prevention programs, including LifeSkills Training, and the services of vendors who can help to connect troubled students to the right programs. This year, 17 of the county’s 43 districts accepted the help. The county is spending $2.4 million helping those districts, plus some community groups, to prevent substance abuse and gambling.

The county has “actually been able to go into more schools” than it used to, and reach down to the elementary school level, said Latika Davis-Jones, assistant deputy director of the department’s Office of Behavioral Health. “I can’t speak to why there hasn’t been more uptake,” she said.

She acknowledged that schools have “a full calendar,” but added that some have addressed the time crunch by offering drug prevention services after the dismissal bell.

In October, the General Assembly required that state agencies update the drug prevention guidance given to school districts, to include opioid and prescription drug information. But the legislature hasn’t yet required that districts use a proven curriculum.

At Penn State, Diana Fishbein is working on a new model.

She’s seen schools at which students pour out the front door, some met by parents who are visibly high on heroin — and administrators do nothing.

When school officials know that a lot of households are dealing with opioid addiction, she said, they can engage those families. Bring in community organizations, healthcare services, maybe psychiatry services, to join the parents on that sidewalk, offering help. If it works, the families get comprehensive help. “And more importantly,” she said, “the school system doesn’t feel like they’re on their own.”

Burned by the dragon

As a senior, Patrick Zekler sat through an assembly including a screening of the federal government’s anti-opioid film Chasing the Dragon, followed by a prosecutor’s careful answers to students’ pointed questions. He thought it was among the most wrongheaded things he’d witnessed while coming up through Carlynton School District. So he took his concerns to the office.

“You’re just trying to scare them,” Mr. Zekler told the principal, he recounted this month. “You give me a week, I’ll write a story, we’ll do this right.” He said his offer was not accepted.

This month Carlynton Junior-Senior High School Principal Michael Loughren said he didn’t recall that conversation, though he certainly remembered the outspoken 2017 graduate. Told of Mr. Zekler’s account, Mr. Loughren said, “Hey, Patrick, why don’t we write that story?”

Mr. Zekler, now 19 and living on Neville Island, comes from a family split by drugs. Thomas Zekler, for instance, was that special kind of uncle — close enough in age to teach Patrick to bowl and to shoot pool, and to play him Bon Jovi songs (badly) on guitar. In and out of court since 2006 on drug, theft or assault charges, Tom died in July, at age 33, from a mixture of fentanyl and cocaine.

Now Patrick Zekler, who works as a cook and auto body repairman, wears his uncle’s flag-festooned hoodie everywhere. He avoided addiction in part by attending meetings of Alateen, a group for young people with substance abuse problems in their families.

Mr. Loughren said that his school has “total commitment” to addressing drug prevention, with a drug and alcohol counselor on site and a mentoring program.

Carlynton Superintendent Gary Peiffer said that this school year, the district added new drug prevention curricula to health classes in grades nine through 12. “We want to get the kids help,” he said, “before it becomes a debilitating health problem as well as a risk of life.”

Rich Lord: rlord@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1542


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Pittsburgh SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“We have a partnership with CVS Cares and the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy to give drug prevention and awareness seminars. They have provided sessions to the majority of our middle schools and high schools. Agencies are also assigned to Pittsburgh Public Schools through our Student Assistance Program (SAP) partnership with the Allegheny County Department of Human Services (DHS) to provide drug education prevention and intervention services. Students are tiered for services based on the CANS assessment. Lastly, students who are charged with drug violations on school grounds received drug intervention services at one of our alternative education placements, the Student Achievement Center.

We do not have a district-sanctioned curriculum for drug prevention and intervention services. We have district-sanctioned partnerships based on the organizational qualifications to deliver the identified services. Students who have a subsequent offense for a drug violation on school grounds receive differentiated programming at the Student Achievement Center. Students are also referred to drug outpatient and inpatient programs based on SAP referrals and/or an external referring agency.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All schools serving students grades six through 12

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All of our nurses received training from Dr. Hacker with the Allegheny County Health Department in August 2016 after the policy was developed (see link below). School Police Officers and Security staff also received separate training.”

Pennsylvania Cyber CS

Beaver County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

Fall 2017. Guest speaker, Mandi Rea, The Prevention Network. PA Cyber addresses drug prevention during Red Ribbon Week events (October 23-31) including an anti-drug poster contest as well as Youth and Teen Leadership workshops at our satellite and support centers with its aim to help students develop skills to make positive life choices based on sound values and successful goals. Curriculum provided through Red Ribbon (redribbon.org) for grades K-12. PA Cyber uses the RTII three tiered strategy to enable early identification and support for students who have a higher than average risk of substance abuse. Also, our school counseling and Student Assistance Program (SAP) assist school personnel in identifying issues which pose a barrier to student success. Students are often referred to community resources across the Commonwealth to receive more in-depth support. At risk student data is measured in the PAYS survey.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

N/A, online school

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“20 staff members have been trained primarily from our health department.”

North Allegheny SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“In the month of October 2017, our elementary schools held several drug prevention assemblies including: drug and alcohol prevention presented to second through fifth grades from Anisha Muhammad, a prevention education specialist from UPMC; Lessons in the kindergarten and first grade classrooms from NA counselors; health & physical education teachers and school counselors co-teach during health & PE at all grade levels regarding drugs and alcohol; In the month of October 2017, our middle schools held drug prevention assemblies including: I Am the Brother of Dragons by Saltworks Theater, Road Radio USA by Bryon Carey; In the month of November 2017, our high school welcomed KDKA-TV/Ford Driving Skills for Life. Anticipated/scheduled assemblies at NA include: Dangers of Vaping by Students Against Destructive Decisions members in high school PE classes in February 2018; Worth It (benefit of good decisions) by CAMFEL assemblies for middle school students in April 2018. Mock crash—a collaboration between first responders from across the district—for high school students before prom in April 2018.

The EVERFI program on opioids is being piloted this spring. In the health and physical education curriculum, the following objectives are addressed by grade level: sixth grade recently (2017) started to address vaping. Demonstrate an understanding of the dangers of tobacco use. Seventh grade understand the dangers and risks of using tobacco and alcohol. Describe how different drugs including marijuana, stimulants, depressants, narcotics, inhalants and hallucinogens affect the body. Ninth Grade an in-depth unit on alcohol, tobacco/vaping, and other illicit drugs. At the elementary level, the schools have utilized the services of UPMC prevention specialist Anisah Muhammad. Ms. Muhammad uses the LifeSkills Training program to instruct not only on substance abuse and education, but also decision-making, ways to deal with stress, communication skills, assertiveness, and positive self-esteem.

The Student Assistance Program (SAP) is followed to support and identify students at higher-than-average risk of substance use. The key for the SAP coordinators helping students comes from communicating as a team with teachers, school counselors and the coordinator. The teachers are seeing the changes in behaviors, or the inconsistency in the students each day, who observe these students in class, lunch duty, in the halls, and in structured and unstructured situations. The SAP coordinators rely on the teachers seeking the support for the students. The conversations with the school counselors and the SAP coordinator with concerns in the home will lead to conversations about issues in the home. The SAP coordinator attempts to build levels of trust with the students with our presentations, conversations, and actions. With any of these students with “”higher-than average”” risk, SAP coordinators have to be willing to communicate honestly with the students and their families. For students that report substance abuse in the homes, the SAP coordinators find any way possible to help our students overcome the barriers that they face. Students may address the concerns their families have and also may keep the information to themselves for the concern someone at home will get in trouble. We have to recognize the concerns and help them with it the best they can.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“Seven certified school nurses and eight support nurses for a total of 15 staff members.”

Seneca Valley SD

Butler County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“DARE intro — fourth grade. DARE — fifth Grade. This is run through the Butler County Sheriff’s Office from January – March. Reality Tour — sixth Grade. Used as a means for offering drug prevention opportunities to families. Drug Kills Dreams Assembly — Secondary level: This is still pending. A local anti-drug program that started as a slogan on a hand-drawn poster 15 years ago has grown to reach students across four counties. Drugs Kill Dreams was started by Ford City District Judge Gary DeComo after adopting the slogan from a fourth grader’s hand drawn anti-drug poster. The program focuses on community prevention as an attempt to avoid prosecution or treatment. Increasing prevention can reduce the need for prosecution or drug treatment. Red Ribbon Week — Intermediate High School (grades seven through nine): Is celebrated annually October 23-31, is the nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention awareness program. Wearing red ribbons during the month of October continues to represent our pledge to live drug free and honors the sacrifice of all who have lost their lives in the fight against drugs. The intermediate high school conducts activities to bring attention to the prevention of drug abuse. Specific to Center Avenue Community School: Jodi Yute from Center for Community Resources in Butler speaks to students. She uses CCR’s “Too Good for Drugs” curriculum. Mr. Tom Long, Center Avenue guidance counselor, is on the board for Stand Tall and has a club for Center Avenue secondary students. Each month they have an event in the evening where Mr. Long takes students to see speakers talk about drug prevention. “Here’s Looking at You 2000” — Elementary Level. Health lessons that incorporate drugs and alcohol discussion are incorporated into science classes — sixth grade. Be Tuff Stand Up — Part of our Olweus program at the Middle School (grades five and six) to talk about being drug free and making positive choices. Health Class Curriculum — eighth grade: Includes five days of instruction/discussion and two guest speakers. Topics: Alcohol, Marijuana, Heroin, Prescription Drugs. Guest speakers are from Center for Community Resources in Butler. Health class curriculum — ninth grade: 10 days of instruction/discussion and three guest speakers. Topics: alcohol, marijuana, heroin, prescription drugs, cocaine, street drugs, hallucinogens. Students complete a research paper on a specific drug topic and present their findings to their class.

Advisory Program — intermediate high school (grades seven through nine): The Advisory Program is a component of the Butler Intermediate School educational program. The Advisory Program promotes student adjustment and success in school, to develop a student’s positive self-concept, to establish positive relationships, and to encourage student involvement. The program is designed to prepare students for future opportunities, as they become responsible members of society. The program hinges on all participants believing in the program and accepting the responsibilities of the program. Advisory activities are scheduled during the advisory period. StandTall Program — secondary level: voluntary program in which students participate in activities that promote abstinence from drugs and alcohol. Students who elect to participate are subject to random drug tests (done at the Nurse’s office by independent community agent). Three students are tested each month. Nearly 250 students participated in 2016-17 and 250 in 2017-2018. Twice a year speakers are brought in to educate students. Stand Tall is associated with the Butler County Against Heroin Task Force.

Student Assistance Program (CORE Team) — Secondary level: The Butler Area School District Core Team is comprised of a group of concerned and trained professional staff members whose purpose is to identify students with problems which inhibit educational growth. The Core Team, a component of the Butler Area School District’s Pupil Personnel Services, seeks to assist students in dealing with the wide variety of behaviors which interfere with their academic performance as well as their social, emotional, physical and mental development. The Core Team’s primary function is to identify students whose behavior causes reason for concern and to initiate a positive plan for intervention. Through Core Team intervention, the school district, in cooperation with community and family, will assure that all young people are educated to the best of their ability to assume the responsibility of becoming contributing members of society. Referral to Butler Intermediate School or Butler Senior High School Core Teams can be initiated by professional staff members or parent/guardian by completing any core team referral form or personally contacting the building liaison.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“Seneca Valley has nine nurses across the District. All nine are trained to administer Naloxone.”

Hempfield Area SD

Westmoreland County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“On October 25, 2017, the Hempfield Area School District sponsored, in coordination with the Westmoreland County Drug Overdose Task Force, a Community Drug Forum at Hempfield Area High School. The event featured a community resource fair, a screening of the documentary film “The Anonymous People”, and a question & answer panel discussion. Participants in the panel included: Mr. Tim Phillips, executive director of the Westmoreland County Drug Overdose Task Force; Mr. Tony Marcocci, a Westmoreland County narcotics detective and member of the Drug Overdose Task Force; Dr. Eric Kocian, of Saint Vincent College, who recently completed a study on addiction in Westmoreland County; Trooper Steven Limani, public information officer for the Pennsylvania State Police; Abbey Zorzi, a woman in recovery; and Michele Schwartmeier, who lost her daughter to addiction. Also, on October 24, 2017, Harrold Middle School sponsored an all-school assembly sponsored by Westmoreland Community Action that also utilized a panel discussion format.

All of our elementary schools (grades K-5) utilize the Realistic Education About Life (R.E.A.L.) program, which is created and administered by staff from the Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects. This program integrates Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug (ATOD) prevention education that is in line with the empowerment goals of Act 211 (Drug and Alcohol Education guidelines from the Pennsylvania Department of Education). Each grade level participates in six 40-minute lessons throughout the school year. The elementary school counselors also present core curriculum addressing social-emotional issues including decision-making, problem-solving, communication skills, and assertiveness skills. The middle school utilizes www.drugfreeworld.org in Health classes. The middle school counselors utilize www.naturalhigh.org during their instructional classes. Sixth graders also participate in the Reality Tour, an award winning, evidenced-based drug prevention program that uses dramatic scenes, instruction, and testimonials to educate both parents and their children with its drug-free message. The middle schools also hold several events during Red Ribbon Week in October, such as a visit from a local K-9 unit, an assembly with former Pennsylvania State Police officers who discuss the legal implications of drug use, and an activity called “Alternative to Drugs” in which students are introduced to or have the opportunity to participate in activities that teachers identify as “anti-drug.” Eighth grade health classes complete a unit of curriculum called “the Truth about Drugs” in which they hear/see real life stories about the dangers of drug use. These students also learn the major aspects of drug addiction and what causes people to have such a difficult time getting off drugs once they start using them. Sixth graders complete an online unit on Prescription Drug Abuse as well. The 10th grade health classes at the high school utilize a health textbook called “Comprehensive Health”. Some of the standards addressed are examining the issues related to the use/non-use of drugs; identify and analyze factors that influence the prevention of drug use; examine the effects of media relative to drug use; examine and apply decision-making process; and assess personal and legal consequences of drug use.

The HASD utilizes the Student Assistance Program (SAP) in each of its buildings. The SAP program is a service designed to assist school personnel in identify issues, including alcohol, drugs, mental health, and behavioral concerns which could pose barriers to a student’s learning and school success. The primary goal of the SAP is to help students overcome these barriers in order for them to achieve, remain in school, and advance through the curriculum. The SAP uses a systematic process along with specially trained school personnel to intervene and refer these students to appropriate in-school and/or community services. Parent involvement in all phases of SAP strengthens the parent’s role and responsibility in the decision making process.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All of the nursing, school security, and instructional staff have been trained in the administration of Naloxone.”

Mt Lebanon SD

Alleghney County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“R.A.P. Assembly: http://www.assemblyline.com/product-details/rap/, Mt. Lebanon Police Department-throughout the year, Sue Harshbarger – Tobacco Middle schools: Once every nine week period the Mt. Lebanon Police Department comes into eighth grade health class to discuss alcohol, they may mention drugs, but it isn’t their focus. Dr. Dina Paul, chronic disease and case management director, Wexford Health Sources, speaks with the students about drugs. Her lesson covers drugs on the street, the drug dealers and how they target kids and some of the medical consequences of drug use. High school: Our health classes have had a variety of speaker over the past few years including Mt. Lebanon Police, Gateway Rehab speakers including Kyle Harder, Joey Delsardo and Tara Philips. We currently incorporate age appropriate lessons written into our health curriculum. We are in the process of updating our elementary health curriculum, consulting with Ethan Hall of Slippery Rock University to align with best practices. In fourth grade the Mt. Lebanon Police Department presentations emphasize good decision making skills including use of drugs and alcohol. Fifth grade consequences and refusal skills are emphasized. We also use the Olweus Bullying Prevention program.

Middle schools: We use the district approved health book to cover the categories of drugs, their effects and where to get help. We also use informational booklets that highlight individual drugs. They are from “”Foundation for a Drug-Free World.”” High school: Our health curriculum focuses on heroin, opioids, other similar drugs, cycle of addiction, addiction in the family, abstaining from alcohol and drugs and refusal skills. All Mt. Lebanon High School students are required to take health since it is a graduation requirement. We do also have a video series from Human Relations Media that address stress, depression and a variety of specific drugs. At the elementary level, principals, teachers, school counselors and the nurses in our school health offices are very in-tuned to the needs of our students and will work with parents to get students help if needed.

For both middle schools and high school: Currently the district utilizes two distinct models for identifying at-risk students. The most common method is via our Student Assistance Program. Students can be referred by teachers, school counselors and parents based on a variety of observable indicators to include changes in grades, attendance and shifting peer groups. Students might also be referred based on other behaviors and/or violations of school rules. Once referred, additional information is collected (with parent permission), a team meeting occurs to include community mental health representation, and parents are invited to meet to discuss a plan of action for helping their child. The student assistance team is holistic in nature looking at a variety of student concerns, to include drugs and alcohol. The district also offers all students in grades seven through 12, again with parental permission, the option to complete a mental health screening called TeenScreen via partnership with Outreach Teen & Family Services. This free screening is made available each year to students in grades seven through 12 with directly mailing to parents about this opportunity for a free mental health check-up, that also specifically addresses drug and alcohol concerns.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All certified school nurses, All other nurses – including substitute nurses working within the health offices, All principals, Superintendent and Assistant Superintendents, Director of Athletics, Director of Communications, Director of Special Education.”

Butler Area SD

Butler County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“DARE intro — fourth grade. DARE — fifth Grade. This is run through the Butler County Sheriff’s Office from January – March. Reality Tour — sixth Grade. Used as a means for offering drug prevention opportunities to families. Drug Kills Dreams Assembly — Secondary level: This is still pending. A local anti-drug program that started as a slogan on a hand-drawn poster 15 years ago has grown to reach students across four counties. Drugs Kill Dreams was started by Ford City District Judge Gary DeComo after adopting the slogan from a fourth grader’s hand drawn anti-drug poster. The program focuses on community prevention as an attempt to avoid prosecution or treatment. Increasing prevention can reduce the need for prosecution or drug treatment. Red Ribbon Week — Intermediate High School (grades seven through nine): Is celebrated annually October 23-31, is the nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention awareness program. Wearing red ribbons during the month of October continues to represent our pledge to live drug free and honors the sacrifice of all who have lost their lives in the fight against drugs. The intermediate high school conducts activities to bring attention to the prevention of drug abuse. Specific to Center Avenue Community School: Jodi Yute from Center for Community Resources in Butler speaks to students. She uses CCR’s “Too Good for Drugs” curriculum. Mr. Tom Long, Center Avenue guidance counselor, is on the board for Stand Tall and has a club for Center Avenue secondary students. Each month they have an event in the evening where Mr. Long takes students to see speakers talk about drug prevention. “Here’s Looking at You 2000” — Elementary Level. Health lessons that incorporate drugs and alcohol discussion are incorporated into science classes — sixth grade. Be Tuff Stand Up — Part of our Olweus program at the Middle School (grades five and six) to talk about being drug free and making positive choices. Health Class Curriculum — eighth grade: Includes five days of instruction/discussion and two guest speakers. Topics: Alcohol, Marijuana, Heroin, Prescription Drugs. Guest speakers are from Center for Community Resources in Butler. Health class curriculum — ninth grade: 10 days of instruction/discussion and three guest speakers. Topics: alcohol, marijuana, heroin, prescription drugs, cocaine, street drugs, hallucinogens. Students complete a research paper on a specific drug topic and present their findings to their class.

Advisory Program — intermediate high school (grades seven through nine): The Advisory Program is a component of the Butler Intermediate School educational program. The Advisory Program promotes student adjustment and success in school, to develop a student’s positive self-concept, to establish positive relationships, and to encourage student involvement. The program is designed to prepare students for future opportunities, as they become responsible members of society. The program hinges on all participants believing in the program and accepting the responsibilities of the program. Advisory activities are scheduled during the advisory period. StandTall Program — secondary level: voluntary program in which students participate in activities that promote abstinence from drugs and alcohol. Students who elect to participate are subject to random drug tests (done at the Nurse’s office by independent community agent). Three students are tested each month. Nearly 250 students participated in 2016-17 and 250 in 2017-2018. Twice a year speakers are brought in to educate students. Stand Tall is associated with the Butler County Against Heroin Task Force.

Student Assistance Program (CORE Team) — Secondary level: The Butler Area School District Core Team is comprised of a group of concerned and trained professional staff members whose purpose is to identify students with problems which inhibit educational growth. The Core Team, a component of the Butler Area School District’s Pupil Personnel Services, seeks to assist students in dealing with the wide variety of behaviors which interfere with their academic performance as well as their social, emotional, physical and mental development. The Core Team’s primary function is to identify students whose behavior causes reason for concern and to initiate a positive plan for intervention. Through Core Team intervention, the school district, in cooperation with community and family, will assure that all young people are educated to the best of their ability to assume the responsibility of becoming contributing members of society. Referral to Butler Intermediate School or Butler Senior High School Core Teams can be initiated by professional staff members or parent/guardian by completing any core team referral form or personally contacting the building liaison.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

None

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

None

Armstrong SD

Armstrong County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

Students Against Destructive Decisions members go to the elementary schools to promote anti drugs, State Farm simulator during prom week. This year we are producing a video with the TV production classes on how drug abuse has affected various people in the building’s lives. Janice Barnhart, teacher, takes a group to Indiana through the Armstrong/Indiana/Clarion D&A Commission. It also is in the eighth and 11th grade health curriculum, which includes bringing in various speakers. Science 8: Current science articles that talk about drug prevention and how harmful it is to your health. Health: 10 class periods done in eighth and 11th grade health classes with Armstrong/Indiana/Clarion Drug & Alcohol Commission, plus what we teach in class in addition. Breathe PA tobacco prevention specialist come in to health classes to instruct students on vaping and medicinal marijuana. AP economics we have discussed the economic effects of drugs. The idea that the negative choice of someone or a group imposes costs (not only dollars) on the society as a whole. Drivers Ed: 1. Teach in class as part of Driver Education curriculum the dangers of alcohol, drugs and driving. 2. West Shamokin Safe Driving Awareness Day has a focus on the dangers of alcohol, drugs, and driving. Assemblies: last year we held one on the dangers of prescriptions, heroin, etc. Drugs Kill Dreams Program that Judge Gary Decomo spearheads in Armstrong County in collaboration with our School District and community agencies. The Armstrong/Indiana/Clarion Drug and Alcohol Commission provides Elderton Elementary with a drug prevention program (Too Good for Drugs) that is presented in health class, grades three and six. It was made up of 10 separate 40-minute sessions with each grade level. It will be given to all grade levels at some point between this spring and next fall. They are also pushing into our health classes to teach a class “Why Animals Don’t Smoke” this spring to all grade levels. Drugs Kill Dreams poster contest fourth grade. Drugs Kill Dreams presentation for sixth grade. Too Good for Drugs: The purpose of this evidence-based program from the Mendez Foundation, is to promote healthy decision-making and positive, healthy, youth development. TGFD teaches students about goal-setting, decision-making, bonding with others, identifying and managing emotions, and communicating effectively. Positive health practices that focus on building healthy self are discussed. In addition, the curriculum includes information about the harmful effects of the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs on students’ bodies and minds. The board may require participation in drug counseling, rehabilitation, testing or other programs as a condition of reinstatement into the school’s educational, extracurricular athletic programs resulting from violations of this policy. The superintendent or designee shall develop administrative guidelines to identify and control substance abuse in the schools which: 1. Establish procedures to deal with students suspected of using, possessing, being under the influence, or distributing controlled substances in school, up to and including expulsion and referral for prosecution. 2. Disseminate to students, parents/guardians and staff the board policy and administrative guidelines governing student abuse of controlled substances. 3. Provide education concerning the dangers of abusing controlled substances. 4. Establish procedures for education and readmission to school of students convicted of offenses involving controlled substances. No student may be admitted to a program that seeks to identify and rehabilitate the potential abuser without the intelligent, voluntary and aware consent of the student and parent/guardian. If based on the student’s behavior, medical symptoms, vital signs or other observable factors, the building principal has reasonable suspicion that the student is under the influence of a controlled substance, the student may be required to submit to drug or alcohol testing. The testing may include, but is not limited to, the analysis of blood, urine, saliva, or the administration of a Breathalyzer test. [Includes a matrix of scenarios and, each with an immediate action, investigation, notifications, discipline.] The Student Assistance Program shall provide assistance in: 1. Identifying issues that pose a barrier to a student’s learning and/or academic achievement. 2. Determining whether or not the identified problem lies with the responsibility of the school. 3. Informing the parent/guardian of a problem affecting the student’s learning and/or academic achievement. 4. Making recommendations to assist the student and the parent/guardian. 5. Providing information on community resources and options to deal with the problem. 6. Establishing links with resources to help resolve the problem. 7. Collaborating with the parent/guardian and agency when students are involved in treatment through a community agency. 8. Providing a plan for in-school support services for the student during and after treatment.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“The School District’s nine school nurses and two LPNs were trained in administration of Naloxone in partnership with the Armstrong Indiana Clarion Drug and Alcohol Commission.”

Norwin SD

Westmoreland County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“We had a naloxone in-service day earlier in the 2017-18 school year. We also celebrate Red Ribbon Week every October throughout the district. We had a speaker at our last in-service educating our staff on the perils and technology of vapes (electronic cigarettes). We also produced a drug forum in October of 2015 hosted by Dr. Cyril Wecht and many other experts in the pain, medication and recovery fields, which included two recovering addicts with local ties. We are using Operation Prevention in our Middle School, Intermediate School and High School throughout our health classes. We use Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects in addition. We also implement anti-drug campaigns in our health classes and video production classes making PSAs. We are currently producing an Opioid Awareness video in partnership with Excela Health. We also started a community awareness committee (90 members) with school and community leaders in conjunction with our PTAs and outside services which meet four times a year to implement and discuss strategies. We also sent employees to complete the DEA’s Citizens Academy (six-week course) which concentrated on the opioid problem.

We have utilized the Student Assistance Program in conjunction with Westmoreland County. It is a collaborative effort between the Norwin School District, Westmoreland County Mental Health, Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects and Westmoreland County Drug and Alcohol Commission. It is comprised of administrators, faculty, school psychologists, and social workers. Students can make confidential referrals to the SAP team about themselves or fellow students concerning drug use, questionable behavior or even wanting to hurt someone or themselves.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“Most all staff and administrators have been educated in the use of Narcan and the proper procedures on when to administer.”

Canon-McMillan SD

Washington County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

We have conducted numerous assemblies over the years regarding drug prevention to include assemblies each year during Red Ribbon Week along with prescription drug addition awareness. Our school resource officers push into each health class is grades seven through 12 to educate students on drug prevention. We have created a partnership with our three municipal police departments along with the Washington County Drug and Alcohol Commission (WDAC) to use the research based program from the Mendez Foundation, Too Good for Drugs/Violence. Our SROs teach the sixth grade TGFD curriculum to all sixth graders, WDAC teaches all fifth graders TGFD and all fourth graders Protecting You Protecting Me (PYPM). For grades one through four, SROs partner with our elementary guidance counselors to teach TGFD. For grades seven to 12, SROs partner with guidance counselors and health teachers infusing the TGFD curriculum. At the kindergarten to sixth level we have Well Check meetings. At the seventh through 12th level we have Student Assistance Program (SAP) teams. Each meet routinely to discuss any student concerns brought by staff members, family members and/or students.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Not stocked in schools, but carried by school resources officers

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“Only the school resource officers have received training on the administration of Narcan.”

Shaler Area SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

Red Ribbon Week, Oct. 2017 (K-12) – school faculty/counselors. Drug assemblies at the middle school (Oct. 2017) – presented by a Shaler Area graduate and current students in Youth Advocacy League. Safety Day, Oct. 2017 (at each of the K-3 primary schools) – County 911, Local EMS, local VFDs, and local police officers and school resource officer (who talked about drug safety). Health classes at the high school – school resource officer and local police come in one time each semester including Dec. 2017 and again in the spring 2018, some classes also have University of Pittsburgh pharmacy students come to talk about the opioid issue. Mock car crash at the high school (May 25, 2018) presented in conjunction with local EMS, law enforcement, local volunteer fire departments, LifeFlight and the county coroner. Opioid Town Hall (April 19, 2018) – a day of assemblies at the middle school and high school and an evening event for the community. This will be the second year Shaler Area School District has hosted this event in cooperation with local law enforcement, local agencies, former assistant U.S. attorney Conor Lamb, and Shaler Area graduates Dr. Tom Brophy and Joe DeMore (Butler County Prison warden). These topics are covered in the health curriculum (4-12) and with emphasis on “making good decisions” at the K-3 level. We conduct risk assessment through OnHand Schools and Student Assistance Program (SAP) at each level to identify students who may be at-risk.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All of the school nurses and School Resource Officer.”

Pine-Richland SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

We had a speaker during the 2016-2017 school year, in connection with the Drug Enforcement Administration. The production of “Off ‘Script,” which shared the stories of the consequences related to addictions to prescription drugs was made available to high school parents during the evening (May 11, 2017) and during the daytime for students in grades nine through 12 (May 17, 2017). Following the presentation, representatives from the FBI and DEA shared information related to opioid and heroin use and consequences to both groups. Drug and alcohol awareness is taught in grades eight through nine via the health curriculum. We do embed drug/alcohol awareness into the health curriculum at the elementary level. The district follows procedures through the Student Assistance Program (SAP), which is a school based comprehensive prevention and intervention program for students in kindergarten through grade 12. This multifaceted, systematic approach is designed to provide education, prevention, early identification, intervention, referral and support services for students exhibiting at risk behaviors which are interfering with their academic, social and emotional well-being. The positive influences of this program encourages student success in the school environment, fosters risk reduction, provides a safe environment and promotes opportunities for knowledge and skill development.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All of our nurses took part in a training (7).”

Connellsville Area SD

Fayette County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

Guidance counselors complete classroom lessons. Drug prevention is taught in Health and Wellness class. We use the Student Assistance Program process and we have an employee from Fayette County Drug and Alcohol as a liaison.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

None

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

The school resource officer and 7 nurses.

Bethel Park SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“Independence Middle School (grades seven through eight) – Conducted an assembly on October 20 with representatives from Duquesne University’s School of Pharmacy on the biological effects of drugs and alcohol. Also have Red Ribbon Week theme days/door decorating contest to enforce the concept of being drug free. They also publicized to the students/parents the September 19 “Stop the Opioid Pandemic Symposium” at Christ United Methodist Church. Neil Armstrong Middle School (grades five through six) — no specific assembly this year. However, we do have Just Say No Clubs for each grade level. Franklin Elementary School (grades K-4) – Celebrated Red Ribbon Week with the school resource officer, Bethel Park Police Officer Joelle Dixon visiting the classrooms to talk to students about what to do if someone offers students a drink, drugs or cigarettes. Every day was a different theme/dress up day. Bethel Park High School (grades nine through 12) – District Judge Ron Arnoni met with ninth graders on October 27 to discuss drugs and the importance of making good decisions. In past years we have had school-wide assemblies with representatives from the Attorney General’s Office, the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Pennsylvania Narcotics Officers Association. But none of these groups has presented this year. Neil Armstrong Middle School—Unit in fifth through sixth grade health classes regarding drugs and the dangers of drugs. Students spend three days on this unit. Independence Middle School—eighth grade students spend two weeks on drug and alcohol education and prevention using resources from drugfreeworld.org. The main focus is on gateway drug use but the teachers do expand the topic to include other drugs and their biological effects. Bethel Park High School – This topic is approached through the health classes, which is a required course in grade 10, but is also offered as an elective in other years. We have designed our own program with input from various research and programs, focusing on the scientific approach—with an emphasis on how the abuse of medicines and drugs change the way the brain functions. They use the U.S. drug schedules to help the students to define the legal issues as well as the dangers. They discuss the various categories of drugs, including narcotics, stimulants, depressants, cannabis, hallucinogens, etc. and the psychological/physiological responses of the body to each category. They discuss addiction and what it does to the body as well as recovery. The students complete a research project and make a presentation of their findings.

We have Duquesne University School of Pharmacy students visit the classes and do presentations on physical addiction, the brain and how it is affected by chemical substances. When we can get it scheduled, we invite counselors from Gateway Rehab to come in and talk about recovery. Elementary Schools—Teachers us the Harcourt Health and Fitness curriculum, which includes chapters on drugs. They also incorporate videos, and other materials to discuss medicines, illegal drugs, household products, street drugs, tobacco products, etc. Throughout the K-12 curriculum, we supplement with a variety of resources, many of which are provided by the Allegheny Intermediate Unit. Our goal is to help the students, not punish them.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“30 employees (Nurses and members of our Crisis Response Team) [trained] to use Narcan. We also provided online training/certification with our Principals/Administrators and teachers”

Peters Township SD

Washington County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“October 24, 2017 – The middle school conducted a Cool2BClean assembly (more on what that is below). February 14, 2018 – Tyler’s Light presentation for all students. This is a drug awareness presentation to educate students about opioid addiction. The presenter is a father who lost his son due to addiction. February 22, 2018 – Family Support Resources Fair – an event for the community to learn of all the various resources available in the area. Mental health and drug and alcohol agencies are invited to provide service information to parents of all ages. April 20, 2018 – The high school conducts a mock crash and abuse awareness event each year prior to the Prom. It is a morning long event. In grades K-8, we also celebrate Red Ribbon Week each fall with events and awareness activities. high school grade level assemblies take place at the start of every school year to detail expectations and what the consequences are for drug and alcohol abuse in the school. The Drug Abuse Resistance Education program is used in grades one to three and five in cooperation with the Peters Township Police Department. Drug prevention is also embedded within our health curriculum in grade seven and at the high school level (personal wellness class and driver’s theory.) The high school class includes an interactive study that includes prescription drugs and alcohol abuse. Our middle school has a Cool2BClean program that encourages positive decision making and sponsors events throughout the school year. Each fall, they kick-off the school year with a school-wide assembly with representatives from the police department, a local pharmacist, as well as a recovered addict. This year the event also included a mother who lost her son to a drug overdose. At the high school the Students Against Destructive Decisions club is a student based organization overseen by staff members to promote awareness for healthy decisions and to educate awareness of the effects of decisions on others. They collaborate on events throughout the year including the mock crash prior to the prom. The mock crash stages a full scale wreck in the high school parking lot as the result of driving under the influence. Peters Township police, fire and EMS and a local funeral home are on hand in the staged event to address injured students, arrest the driver, etc.

Throughout the district, our counselors work closely with the teachers at all levels to identify students at risk through team meetings and “kid talk” meetings that occur monthly. At the high school level, the Student Assistance Program (SAP) is a service designed to help students dealing with grief or loss, divorce, addiction, and chronic stress/anxiety that can negatively impact a student’s academic, emotional and social well-being. Referrals to the SAP team can be made by parents, teachers, administrators, or other students. The team meets regularly to identify students, gather information, develop interventions to assist the student, and partner with community agencies. Prior to the start of the 2017-2018 school year, staff members at the high school also took part in mental health training to help identify students at risk.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“Our nursing staff at each building has trained the entire teaching staff to administer Narcan. In addition, our School Resource Officer is also trained.”

North Hills SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

Numerous elementary schools have had presentations from Ross police, the district’s security officer and former Ross Drug Abuse Resistance Education officer, high school Students Against Destructive Decisions members and Philip Little from the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office. The middle school will be holding an assembly with Philip Little later this school year. We are also in the midst of planning a Town Hall meeting about the opioid epidemic in partnership with Ross and West View police departments, the local magistrate’s office, Drug Enforcement Administration, state Attorney General’s Office and medical professionals. High school students will take part in an assembly related to this event and will be encouraged to attend the meeting. Our teachers conduct a two-week drug unit in all of our health classes that covers all drugs. They spend a lot of time on the more current ones including prescription drugs. Our district team (counselors, social workers) identifies students of concern. In our Student Assistance Team weekly meeting, those students are discussed along with services, supports and referrals identified per student.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“2 per building at high school and middle school”

Upper Saint Clair SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“Upper St. Clair rarely uses assemblies for this particular issue. Instead, there is classroom instruction, typically by school counselors and/or health/physical education teachers, sometimes followed by a guest speaker /program that directly correlates to the subject at hand. The learning opportunities outlined below were conducted or are scheduled for the current school year: Oct. 23-24, grade eight; and Nov. 1 and Nov. 6, grade seven: Every seventh and eighth grader attended a presentation by Nick Shea, an Upper St. Clair graduate and recovering addict. He gives a talk about his life and experience in USC and his path to addiction. The program is facilitated by Jace Palmer, school counselor. In grades six and eight, we have a program with the Upper St. Clair Township police called CHAMPS. Each student participates in three classes throughout the year covering prevention topics, decision making, refusal skills, consequences, etc. (similar to the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program). At the end of eighth grade, every eighth grader attends a presentation from Mike Burch called “Bryan’s Story” about his son, Bryan (an Upper St. Clair graduate), who died from a heroin overdose. “Bryan’s Story” has been presented to USC students for more than 10 years. Within the sixth grade guidance curriculum, school counselors teach refusal skills, good decision-making, and prevention strategies. On Feb. 12 and Feb. 13, officers from the Upper St. Clair Township Police Department will speak with ninth grade health and physical education students about drug and alcohol use/addiction and responsible decision-making at this age.

The school district also partners with the Youth Steering Committee of Upper St. Clair, which provides community/educational programming for youth and their families. In particular, this group is committed to reducing the incidence of drug and alcohol abuse among the youth in the community. Among other programs, Bryan’s Story has been presented to parents and community members through the Youth Steering Committee as well as through PTA/PTO events. Upper St. Clair High School uses the EVERFI online program, as a supplement to the ninth grade health course. In addition to ninth grade health, drug prevention is embedded within the 10th and 11th grade physical education courses. Upper St. Clair has developed its own drug prevention curriculum for grades five through 12 that includes alcohol, tobacco and other illegal drugs/prescription drugs as well as the science of addiction. The curriculum is taught by school counselors and wellness staff. Current eighth graders were also taught from the curriculum Operation Prevention, offered free through the Drug Enforcement Administration in collaboration with Discovery Education.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All school nurses (4) All health room aides (4) Administrators (6) Safety & Security (3).”

Baldwin-Whitehall SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

We have shown the play, Off Script to all children in grades six through 12, conducted a screening of Chasing the Dragon, along with related speakers, had multiple speakers both from the community and from Narcotics Anonymous speak to our students about their own battles with addiction. Some of these speakers are alumni that have walked our hallways – these had the most impact to the students. On October 12, 2017, Baldwin High School hosted “Off Script” from Saltworks Theatre Company. We had two performances for the entire student body. On March 8, 2018, BHS will be hosting “The Way Out,” Saltworks Theatre Company’s new show addressing the opioid and heroin epidemic. There will also be two performances for the entire student body. We cover the topic in health class, however we are most proud of our collaboration with Whitehall police, who provide Drug Abuse Resistance Education instruction for all students, K-12 in all of our schools. At our schools, we utilize a Student Assistance Program where our school social workers, guidance counselors, administrators and teachers can collaborate on topics such as this and identify problem situations around the school. We also have a school based probation officer on site that attends these meetings.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All nurses and administrators have been trained in the administration of Narcan – as well as each school’s Code Blue Team (school level first responders).”

Greater Latrobe SD

Westmoreland County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

“The Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects regularly provides drug-free education programs to students at both the elementary and secondary levels. Research-based lessons are provided to students in a regular classroom setting. Research has shown that large, school-wide assemblies are not the most effective way to make a meaningful impact regarding drug prevention. The Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects provides age-appropriate curriculum during the classroom lessons. They serve students K-12 within the classroom. We receive dollars from the county to support these services but also use some district funds to ensure that all students receive grade-appropriate D&A prevention lessons. Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects also developed a program that has been approved to specifically address prescription drugs and is taught in grade 10 along with underage drinking taught in grade 11. Finally, in grade 12 the topic addressed is “”drug-free workplace”” and “”graduation expectations.”” We had staff trained who used the LifeSkills Training program at our junior high school but they found the curriculum overlapped their health curriculum. Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects will offer this LifeSkills Training curriculum this coming fall. Saint Vincent College Prevention Projects provides our students with the following evidence-based programs depending on their grade level: Project Toward No Drug Abuse, Project ALERT, Too Good for Drugs/Violence.

The district has Student Assistance Programs at all five schools. Any student who is experiencing barriers to education may be referred, or initiate a self-referral. Barriers to education may include a variety of topics, including mental wellness, poverty, social-emotional needs, family support and/or substance abuse.”

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

All

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All school nurses, school counselors and building principals have been trained to administer naloxone. Several of the central office administrators have also received proper training.”

Plum Borough SD

Allegheny County

What the district says about its drug prevention programming and curriculum, and efforts to address any drug problems among students or families.

January 2017 we held a Parent Forum on the heroin/opioid crisis. Speakers were: U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, FBI and University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy representatives. LifeSkills Training – sixth grade; Operation Prevention for grades three through 12 and EVERFI for ninth through 12th. We use our Student Assistance Program to identify and assist students.

Which schools stock naloxone, a.k.a. Narcan?

Middle and high schools

Who is trained in the use of naloxone/Narcan?

“All nurses in the district.”

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